008 – 2009 Created reusable test plan for GV / GIV Custom Interior Furnishings eliminating the need to develop individual test plans for each s/n.
Sept. 2005, Received authorization to make findings of compliance for 14 CFR § 25.856(a) as a DAS AR.
Summer 2005, Lead cross-site team in developing Gulfstream policy for non-essential electrical equipment, including COTS equipment. Result; COTS Issue Paper released, setting the standard for Commercial Off the Shelf equipment installed in Aircraft. Later to be used by RTCA with portions being
directly incorporated into their document DO-313.
April 2005, Developed 25.856(a) Final Phase Compliance Test Plan Large Cabin Gulfstream Aircraft March 2005, Attended Materials Flammability Working Group Meeting hosted by the FAA’s Technical Research Center, Atlantic City, NJ
March 2005, Attended DER Radiant Panel Test Workshop, FAA Technical Center Jan. 2005, Developed and submitted comments on Draft Advisory Circular 25.856-1X to GAMA for transmittal to FAA.Fall 2004, Developed flammability evaluations/test plans/reports for avionics/electrical equipment installed during the outfitting of Gulfstream large cabin aircraft.

Fall 2004
Wntr 2005    Developed Flammability Assessments for Avionics/Electrical Systems STCs, 21 in total, and counting.   
    
August 2004    Developed Avionics/Electrical flammability reports in support Return to Service for GV-SPs 5030 & 5025.  
    
July 2004    Represented Final Phase Engineering for the Gulfstream Team during talks with representatives from the JAA/EASA Cabin Safety Team and the FAA Atlanta ACO in determining the JAA/EASA certification basis for the GIV-X. 
    
April 2004    Attended FAA Part 21 Seminar, Wichita, KS
    
April 2004    Attended FAA DER Re-current Training Seminar, Atlanta, GA
    
September 2003        Met with Michael Marcus, Austrocontrol/JAA Cabin Safety Team Panel 8 in regards to export of GV S/N 687 to Austria.
    
July 2003    Assisted Gulfstream’s Aircraft Certification Office in developing  the Gulfstream position for GV-SP Issue Paper regarding Black Box flammability leading to Type Certification of the GV-SP. 
    
July 2003        Generated JAR Compliance Reports for the Cabin STC and Acoustic Liner STC in support of JAA Validation of GV S/N 582 (in-service aircraft).
    
Winter 2003    Developed and executed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment for premium package crew lavatory waste container.
    
Fall 2002        Revised Finish Control Drawing for 16g Seating in support of BE Aerospace’s MOU with the Orlando MIDO and ATL-ACO.
    
September 2002        Attended meeting at the Seattle Transport Directorate to discuss Gulfstream Aerospace's position regarding Portable Fire Protection in Passenger Cabins and Class B Baggage Compartments.
    
Summer 2002    Executed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment. Generated report outlining results. 
    
March 2002    Attended Flammability Working Group Meeting, Atlantic City, NJ.
    
Winter 2002         Developed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment to provide basis for future similarity reports.


 Participated in Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) for the Materials Flammability Working Group which lead to NPRM published in the Federal           Register on 07/03/2019; Interior Parts and Components Fire Protection for Transport Category Airplanes. That proposal replaces mandatory testing methods with performance-based standards for flammability and fire protection. This change will improve safety and standardization and will be applicable to materials currently used to construct parts and components as well as to new materials that become available in the future.

Developed GAC Policy for Flammability of Electrical Equipment, Wire and Cable, accepted by the Atlanta ACO and now part the Gulfstream ODA’s Methods of Compliance Library.

 Participated in C&D Zodiac/Boeing Co. Materials Flammability Standardization Task Group developing Data in support of FAA Policy Statement;

 PS-ANM-25.853-01-R2 Flammability Testing of Interior Materials regularly interfacing with Jeff Gardlin, FAA – Standards Staff Cabin Safety

 Providing EAR Support to Gulfstream Special Missions Projects including Navy TSRA Projects.

 Attended Engineering Safety Training with Pedro Carleial to include; Functional Hazard Assessment (FHA), System safety assessment (SSA), Fault tree analysi (FTA) and Development Assurance level (DAL)

 Oversaw flammable fluid testing in support of G650 Development, interfaced with Dan Jaquet, Mechanical Systems Engineer, Transport Aircraft Directorate and Jeff Gardlin, Dynamic Seats and Materials Flammability Engineer, Transport Aircraft Directorate

 Co-wrote/released reusable Materials Flammability Test Plan for G650/Elite Interior Furnishings.

Oversaw Fire Containment testing in support of G650 Passenger Cabin MSTC.

 Developed Gulfstream Position for G650 Issue Paper for Baggage Fire Protection and presented same to the Transport Aircraft Directorate Standards Staff,     Renton, Washington along with Atlanta ACO Staff; Gerald Avella, Neil Berryman and Bill Herderich.

 Created reusable test plan for GV / GIV Custom Interior Furnishings eliminating the need to develop individual test plans for each individual delivery

Provided AR Support to G650 Production Engineering Crew & Equipment and Waste & Water teams during G650 development.

 Lead cross-site team in developing Gulfstream policy for non-essential electrical equipment, including COTS equipment. Later to be used by RTCA with portions being directly incorporated into their document DO-313.

Developed 25.856(a) Final Phase Compliance Test Plan Large Cabin Gulfstream Aircraft

Served as FAA DAS AR Trainee for Interior Arrangement and Compliance Inspection

Participated in Materials Flammability Working Group coordinated by the FAA’s Technical Research Center, Atlantic City, NJ, (2001 to present) 

Attended DER Radiant Panel Test Workshop, FAA Technical Center

Developed and submitted comments on Draft Advisory Circular 25.856-1X to GAMA for transmittal to FAA.

Developed flammability evaluations/test plans/reports for avionics/electrical equipment installed during the outfitting of Gulfstream large cabin aircraft.

 

Developed Avionics/Electrical flammability reports in support Return to Service for GV-SPs 5030 & 5025. 

Assisted Kevin Fryer (DAS AR) with Compliance Inspection for the Custom Interior STC on G-IV S/N 1521

Represented Final Phase Engineering for the Gulfstream Team during talks with Mikel Marcus from the JAA/EASA Cabin Safety Team and FAA Atlanta ACO   personell in determining the JAA/EASA certification basis for the GIV-X.

Developed the Gulfstream position for the following Certification Review Items raised by the JAA/EASA Cabin Safety Team during the GIV-X certification effort:

Emergency Landing Dynamic Conditions

Exit Marking-Locator Signs

Partition Doors in Passenger Compartments

Assisted DER Robert V. Hodges with JAR 25 Compliance Inspection in support of JAA Validation of Custom Interior STC, GV-SP S/N 5019.

Attended FAA Part 21 Seminar, Wichita, KS

Attended FAA DER Re-current Training Seminar, Atlanta, GA

Served as DAS AR Trainee for Interior Arrangement and Compliance Inspections

Generated JAR Compliance Reports for the Cabin STC and Acoustic Liner STC in support of JAA Validation of GV-SP S/N 5019.

Developed Work Scope for GV-SPs S/N 5004, 5011 and 5019 outlining modifications required for JAA Validation of  STCs.

Assisted DER Robert V. Hodges with JAR 25 Compliance Inspection in support of JAA Validation of Custom Interior STC, GV S/N 582.

Met with Michael Marcus, Austrocontrol/JAA Cabin Safety Team Panel 8 in regards to export of GV S/N 687 to Austria.

Assisted DER Robert V. Hodges with JAR 25 Compliance Inspection in support of JAA Validation of Custom Interior STC, GV S/N 687(Longbeach completion).

Assisted Gulfstream’s Production Certification Office in developing the Gulfstream position for GV-SP Issue Paper regarding Black Box flammability leading to   Type Certification of the GV-SP.

 Generated JAR Compliance Reports for the Cabin STC and Acoustic Liner STC in support of JAA Validation of GV S/N 582 (in-service aircraft).

 Developed Work Scope for GV S/N 687 outlining modifications required for JAA Validation of installed STCs .

 Developed Work Scope for GV S/N 582 outlining modifications required for JAA Validation of installed STCs. (in-service aircraft)

Revised Passenger Oxygen System JAR Compliance Report in support of JAA Validation of Passenger Oxygen STC, GV S/N 682.

Generated JAR Compliance Reports for the Cabin STC and Acoustic Liner STC in support of JAA Validation of same, GV S/N 682.

Developed Work Scope for GV S/N 682 outlining modifications required for JAA Validation of installed STCs.

 Developed and executed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment for premium package crew lavatory waste container.

Revised Finish Control Drawing for 16g Seating in support of BE Aerospace’s MOU with the Orlando MIDO and ATL-ACO.

 Assisted David Molnar (DAS AR) with Compliance Inspection for the Custom Interior STC on G-IV S/N 1473.

 Assisted David Molnar (DAS AR) with Compliance Inspection for the Custom Interior STC on G-V S/N 662.

Executed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment. Generated report outlining results.

 Assisted Kevin Fryer (DAS AR) in reviewing Cabin Interior DWGs for Interior Arrangement Approval, A/C 662.

Conducted "Lessons Learned" meetings that review the Compliance discrepancies from last Interior Arrangement Evaluation, and apply findings to next aircraft.   Most notable; Standardized conference table placards location to more inconspicuous spot on the edge of the conference tables, only visible when the leaves are folded in the TT & L position. Result; Improved Aesthetics while maintaining compliance.

 Assisted Kevin Fryer (DAS AR) with Interior Arrangement review of the DWG's for GV S/N 665 Cabin STC.

 Assisted David Molnar (DAS AR) with Compliance Inspection for the Custom Interior STC on G-IV S/N 1449

 Chaired series of meetings to provide Engineering Design Leads and Designers direction to reduce the number of compliance squawks regarding placards.

 Developed/Executed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment to provide basis for future similarity reports.

 Assisted David Molnar (DAS AR) with Interior Arrangement review of the DWG's for G-IV S/N 1449 Cabin STC.

October 2001, Attended the International Fire and Cabin Safety Research Conference in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

June 2001, Became DAS AR for Flammability

Transferred control of Flammability Testing from GAC Quality Control to Completion Mechanical Engineering and continue to develop Flammability Test Plans for Aircraft completed in both Savannah and Brunswick.

Created and implemented new structure for Flammability Test Plan/Reports

Initiated transferring control of Materials Flammability from Quality Control to Engineering

Prior ​Work Experience:

Senior Airworthiness Inspector in the Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation's Completion Center, January 1998 to October 2000, where I ensured Quality and Conformity to Design during Completion and Delivery of both G-IV and G-V Aircraft, following multiple aircraft thru the full completion process from induction to delivery. Performing Company Conformity of aircraft to the STC Design Data.

Worked with Engineering to resolve design issues both Completion and Production.

Identified compliance issues during the completion process. Performed numerous Company Conformity Inspections.

Assisted in many DAS Conformity Inspections.

Accompanied aircraft on test flights during the delivery cycle.

 Aircraft Maintenance Technician performing various Mechanical tasks on GI, GII, GIII and GIV aircraft, including Structural Sheetmetal, Powerplant and Systems Work

Aviation Mechanic I (A & P Mechanic) for Comair Airlines, Inc. where I maintained a Commercial Fleet Consisting of Canadair Regional Jets, Embraer Brasilias and Fairchild Metroliner IIIs (“A” checks to “C” checks) Run and Taxi Qualified on EMB120 and Run Qualified on Metroliner III

Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic for the Comair Aviation Academy where I maintained a training fleet of Cessna C-152s, C-172s, C-172RGs and Piper PA-44s, performing mostly 100 hour Inspections, to include checking compression and a full run-up.

Sept. 2005, Received authorization to make findings of compliance for 14 CFR § 25.856(a) as a DAS AR.


April 2005, Developed 25.856(a) Final Phase Compliance Test Plan Large Cabin Gulfstream Aircraft


March 2005, Attended DER Radiant Panel Test Workshop, FAA Technical Center

 

Jan. 2005, Developed and submitted comments on Draft Advisory Circular 25.856-1X to GAMA for transmittal to FAA.

 

Fall 2004, Developed flammability evaluations/test plans/reports for avionics/electrical equipment installed during the outfitting of Gulfstream large cabin aircraft.

Fall 2004
Wntr 2005    Developed Flammability Assessments for Avionics/Electrical Systems STCs, 21 in total, and counting.   
    
August 2004    Developed Avionics/Electrical flammability reports in support Return to Service for GV-SPs 5030 & 5025.  
    
July 2004    Represented Final Phase Engineering for the Gulfstream Team during talks with representatives from the JAA/EASA Cabin Safety Team and the FAA Atlanta ACO in determining the JAA/EASA certification basis for the GIV-X. 
    
April 2004    Attended FAA Part 21 Seminar, Wichita, KS
    
April 2004    Attended FAA DER Re-current Training Seminar, Atlanta, GA
    
September 2003        Met with Michael Marcus, Austrocontrol/JAA Cabin Safety Team Panel 8 in regards to export of GV S/N 687 to Austria.
    
July 2003    Assisted Gulfstream’s Aircraft Certification Office in developing  the Gulfstream position for GV-SP Issue Paper regarding Black Box flammability leading to Type Certification of the GV-SP. 
    
July 2003        Generated JAR Compliance Reports for the Cabin STC and Acoustic Liner STC in support of JAA Validation of GV S/N 582 (in-service aircraft).
    
Winter 2003    Developed and executed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment for premium package crew lavatory waste container.
    
Fall 2002        Revised Finish Control Drawing for 16g Seating in support of BE Aerospace’s MOU with the Orlando MIDO and ATL-ACO.
    
September 2002        Attended meeting at the Seattle Transport Directorate to discuss Gulfstream Aerospace's position regarding Portable Fire Protection in Passenger Cabins and Class B Baggage Compartments.
    
Summer 2002    Executed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment. Generated report outlining results. 
    
March 2002    Attended Flammability Working Group Meeting, Atlantic City, NJ.
    
Winter 2002         Developed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment to provide basis for future similarity reports.

 

  • Developed GAC Policy for Flammability of Electrical Equipment, Wire and Cable, accepted by the Atlanta ACO and now part the Gulfstream ODA’s Methods of Compliance Library.

  •  Participated in C&D Zodiac/Boeing Co. Materials Flammability Standardization Task Group developing Data in support of FAA Policy Statement;

  •  PS-ANM-25.853-01-R2 Flammability Testing of Interior Materials regularly interfacing with Jeff Gardlin, FAA – Standards Staff Cabin Safety

  •  Providing EAR Support to Gulfstream Special Missions Projects including Navy TSRA Projects.

  •  Attended Engineering Safety Training with Pedro Carleial to include; Functional Hazard Assessment (FHA), System safety assessment (SSA), Fault tree analysi (FTA) and Development Assurance level (DAL)

  •  Oversaw flammable fluid testing in support of G650 Development, interfaced with Dan Jaquet, Mechanical Systems Engineer, Transport Aircraft Directorate and Jeff Gardlin, Dynamic Seats and Materials Flammability Engineer, Transport Aircraft Directorate

  •  Co-wrote/released reusable Materials Flammability Test Plan for G650/Elite Interior Furnishings.

  • Oversaw Fire Containment testing in support of G650 Passenger Cabin MSTC.

  •  Developed Gulfstream Position for G650 Issue Paper for Baggage Fire Protection and presented same to the Transport Aircraft Directorate Standards Staff,     Renton, Washington along with Atlanta ACO Staff; Gerald Avella, Neil Berryman and Bill Herderich.

  •  Created reusable test plan for GV / GIV Custom Interior Furnishings eliminating the need to develop individual test plans for each individual delivery

  • Provided AR Support to G650 Production Engineering Crew & Equipment and Waste & Water teams during G650 development.

  •  Lead cross-site team in developing Gulfstream policy for non-essential electrical equipment, including COTS equipment. Later to be used by RTCA with portions being directly incorporated into their document DO-313.

  • Developed 25.856(a) Final Phase Compliance Test Plan Large Cabin Gulfstream Aircraft

  • Served as FAA DAS AR Trainee for Interior Arrangement and Compliance Inspection

  • Participated in Materials Flammability Working Group coordinated by the FAA’s Technical Research Center, Atlantic City, NJ, (2001 to present) 

  • Attended DER Radiant Panel Test Workshop, FAA Technical Center

  • Developed and submitted comments on Draft Advisory Circular 25.856-1X to GAMA for transmittal to FAA.

  • Developed flammability evaluations/test plans/reports for avionics/electrical equipment installed during the outfitting of Gulfstream large cabin aircraft.

  •  

  • Developed Avionics/Electrical flammability reports in support Return to Service for GV-SPs 5030 & 5025. 

  • Assisted Kevin Fryer (DAS AR) with Compliance Inspection for the Custom Interior STC on G-IV S/N 1521

  • Represented Final Phase Engineering for the Gulfstream Team during talks with Mikel Marcus from the JAA/EASA Cabin Safety Team and FAA Atlanta ACO   personell in determining the JAA/EASA certification basis for the GIV-X.

  • Developed the Gulfstream position for the following Certification Review Items raised by the JAA/EASA Cabin Safety Team during the GIV-X certification effort:

    • Emergency Landing Dynamic Conditions

    • Exit Marking-Locator Signs

    • Partition Doors in Passenger Compartments

  • Assisted DER Robert V. Hodges with JAR 25 Compliance Inspection in support of JAA Validation of Custom Interior STC, GV-SP S/N 5019.

  • Attended FAA Part 21 Seminar, Wichita, KS

  • Attended FAA DER Re-current Training Seminar, Atlanta, GA

  • Served as DAS AR Trainee for Interior Arrangement and Compliance Inspections

  • Generated JAR Compliance Reports for the Cabin STC and Acoustic Liner STC in support of JAA Validation of GV-SP S/N 5019.

  • Developed Work Scope for GV-SPs S/N 5004, 5011 and 5019 outlining modifications required for JAA Validation of  STCs.

  • Assisted DER Robert V. Hodges with JAR 25 Compliance Inspection in support of JAA Validation of Custom Interior STC, GV S/N 582.

  • Met with Michael Marcus, Austrocontrol/JAA Cabin Safety Team Panel 8 in regards to export of GV S/N 687 to Austria.

  • Assisted DER Robert V. Hodges with JAR 25 Compliance Inspection in support of JAA Validation of Custom Interior STC, GV S/N 687(Longbeach completion).

  • Assisted Gulfstream’s Production Certification Office in developing the Gulfstream position for GV-SP Issue Paper regarding Black Box flammability leading to   Type Certification of the GV-SP.

  •  Generated JAR Compliance Reports for the Cabin STC and Acoustic Liner STC in support of JAA Validation of GV S/N 582 (in-service aircraft).

  •  Developed Work Scope for GV S/N 687 outlining modifications required for JAA Validation of installed STCs .

  •  Developed Work Scope for GV S/N 582 outlining modifications required for JAA Validation of installed STCs. (in-service aircraft)

  • Revised Passenger Oxygen System JAR Compliance Report in support of JAA Validation of Passenger Oxygen STC, GV S/N 682.

  • Generated JAR Compliance Reports for the Cabin STC and Acoustic Liner STC in support of JAA Validation of same, GV S/N 682.

  • Developed Work Scope for GV S/N 682 outlining modifications required for JAA Validation of installed STCs.

  •  Developed and executed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment for premium package crew lavatory waste container.

  • Revised Finish Control Drawing for 16g Seating in support of BE Aerospace’s MOU with the Orlando MIDO and ATL-ACO.

  •  Assisted David Molnar (DAS AR) with Compliance Inspection for the Custom Interior STC on G-IV S/N 1473.

  •  Assisted David Molnar (DAS AR) with Compliance Inspection for the Custom Interior STC on G-V S/N 662.

  • Executed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment. Generated report outlining results.

  •  Assisted Kevin Fryer (DAS AR) in reviewing Cabin Interior DWGs for Interior Arrangement Approval, A/C 662.

  • Conducted "Lessons Learned" meetings that review the Compliance discrepancies from last Interior Arrangement Evaluation, and apply findings to next aircraft.   Most notable; Standardized conference table placards location to more inconspicuous spot on the edge of the conference tables, only visible when the leaves are folded in the TT & L position. Result; Improved Aesthetics while maintaining compliance.

  •  Assisted Kevin Fryer (DAS AR) with Interior Arrangement review of the DWG's for GV S/N 665 Cabin STC.

  •  Assisted David Molnar (DAS AR) with Compliance Inspection for the Custom Interior STC on G-IV S/N 1449

  •  Chaired series of meetings to provide Engineering Design Leads and Designers direction to reduce the number of compliance squawks regarding placards.

  •  Developed/Executed Test Plan to demonstrate compliance with FAR 25.853(h) Waste Container Fire Containment to provide basis for future similarity reports.

  •  Assisted David Molnar (DAS AR) with Interior Arrangement review of the DWG's for G-IV S/N 1449 Cabin STC.

  • October 2001, Attended the International Fire and Cabin Safety Research Conference in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

  • June 2001, Became DAS AR for Flammability

  • Transferred control of Flammability Testing from GAC Quality Control to Completion Mechanical Engineering and continue to develop Flammability Test Plans for Aircraft completed in both Savannah and Brunswick.

  • Created and implemented new structure for Flammability Test Plan/Reports

  • Initiated transferring control of Materials Flammability from Quality Control to Engineering

Prior ​Work Experience:

Senior Airworthiness Inspector in the Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation's Completion Center, January 1998 to October 2000, where I ensured Quality and Conformity to Design during Completion and Delivery of both G-IV and G-V Aircraft, following multiple aircraft thru the full completion process from induction to delivery. Performing Company Conformity of aircraft to the STC Design Data.

  • Worked with Engineering to resolve design issues both Completion and Production.

  • Identified compliance issues during the completion process. Performed numerous Company Conformity Inspections.

  • Assisted in many DAS Conformity Inspections.

  • Accompanied aircraft on test flights during the delivery cycle.

 Aircraft Maintenance Technician performing various Mechanical tasks on GI, GII, GIII and GIV aircraft, including Structural Sheetmetal, Powerplant and Systems Work

Aviation Mechanic I (A & P Mechanic) for Comair Airlines, Inc. where I maintained a Commercial Fleet Consisting of Canadair Regional Jets, Embraer Brasilias and Fairchild Metroliner IIIs (“A” checks to “C” checks) Run and Taxi Qualified on EMB120 and Run Qualified on Metroliner III

Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic for the Comair Aviation Academy where I maintained a training fleet of Cessna C-152s, C-172s, C-172RGs and Piper PA-44s, performing mostly 100 hour Inspections, to include checking compression and a full run-up.

Education:

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

  • Bachelor of Science Degree in Aeronautical Studies

Curriculum included; Human Factors, Flight Physiology, Air Crash Investigation, Physics, Aviation Law, Advanced Meteorology, Airport Development and Operations, Advanced Aeronautical Navigation, Astronomy (Theoretical Space Propulsion) 

During my tenure teamed with my roommate using my Airframe and Powerplant License to support operating his C-172 Cessna Sky Hawk within a flight school environment performing 100 hour inspections and Line Maintenance in exchange for Flight Training; Obtained FAA  Private Pilot License; Single Engine/Land

  • Associate of Science in Aviation Maintenance Technology; Curriculum included; Aerodynamics, Helicopter Design & Maintenance , Turbine Engine Design & Maintenance, Piston Engine Design & Maintenance, Pressure Carburetor Design & Maintenance, Intro to Digital Logic, Airframe Structural  Design & Maintenance Including Metal, Composite, Wood, Dope and Fabric, FAA AC 43.13 standard repair manual and its use, Interpreting and Complying with FAA Regulations.

  • Obtained FAA Air Frame and Power Plant Mechanic License

     

Even people without symptoms can infect other just by speaking but a simple cloth covering can stop us spreading harmful droplets (The Gardian)

The simplicity of those recommendations is likely unsettling to people anxious to do more to protect themselves, so it’s no surprise that face masks are in short supply—despite the CDC specifically not recommending them for healthy people trying to protect against COVID-19. “It seems kind of intuitively obvious that if you put something—whether it’s a scarf or a mask—in front of your nose and mouth, that will filter out some of these viruses that are floating around out there,” says Dr. William Schaffner, professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University. The only problem: that’s not effective against respiratory illnesses like the flu and COVID-19. If it were, “the CDC would have recommended it years ago,” he says. “It doesn’t, because it makes science-based recommendations.”

Treetopflyer13; Wearing a scarf or a mask and eye protection is essential to protecting one’s self in that it prevents one’s self from touching their eyes and mouth…until they have had a chance to wash their hands…

As the new coronavirus COVID-19 spreads in the U.S., people who are well want to stay that way. But since no vaccines are currently available, the strongest weapons Americans have are basic preventive measures like hand-washing and sanitizing surfaces, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The science, according to the CDC, says that surgical masks won’t stop the wearer from inhaling small airborne particles, which can cause infection. Nor do these masks form a snug seal around the face. The CDC recommends surgical masks only for people who already show symptoms of coronavirus and must go outside, since wearing a mask can help prevent spreading the virus by protecting others nearby when you cough or sneeze. The agency also recommends these masks for caregivers of people infected with the virus.

The CDC also does not recommend N95 respirators—the tight-fitting masks designed to filter out 95% of particles from the air that you breathe—for use, except for health care workers. Doctors and health experts keep spreading the word. “Seriously people- STOP BUYING MASKS!” tweeted Dr. Jerome Adams, the U.S. Surgeon General, on Feb. 29. “They are NOT effective in preventing general public from catching #Coronavirus, but if healthcare providers can’t get them to care for sick patients, it puts them and our communities at risk!” In an interview with Fox & Friends, Adams said that wearing a mask can even increase your risk of getting the virus. “Folks who don’t know how to wear them properly tend to touch their faces a lot and actually can increase the spread of coronavirus.”

Treetopflyer13; Again, how about Wearing a scarf or a Bandana over your Nose and Mouth, save the masks / respirators for the health care workers. When you get home, wash your hands before you remove your Scarf or Bandana and Sunglasses 😉

The bottom line, experts say, is that masks might help keep people with COVID-19 from unknowingly passing along the virus. But the evidence for the efficacy of surgical or homemade masks is limited, and masks aren't the most important protection against the coronavirus. https://www.livescience.com/author/stephanie-pappas

 

 

The conditions include adequate testing for COVID-19, ensuring that hospitals can treat all patients and pinpointing individuals who have been in contact with someone infected with the disease. Crucially, the team wants to see a sustained decrease in coronavirus cases for at least 14 days, the maximum incubation time for infection.

Getting the country back to work won't come all at once but will roll out over four stages, the authors say. The first phase, which we're currently in, involves slowing the spread of COVID-19 by maintaining physical distancing, closing schools and businesses and asking people to work remotely. It also calls for an increased capacity to test and diagnose people who have potentially been exposed, such as health care and other essential workers. The report calls for an expansion of critical-care hospital beds and access to ventilators, as well as increased supplies of personal protective equipment for health care workers. (Everyone should be encouraged to wear nonmedical fabric face masks when in public, the authors say.)

The World Health Organization updated its guidance to outline six conditions for reducing transmission to include sufficient public health capacity to handle COVID-19 outbreaks and measures to prevent workplace spread.

The White House has also presented guidelines for reopening the nation, a priority for President Donald Trump. Its three phases run from continued remote work and physical distancing for vulnerable individuals to schools reopening and nonessential travel resuming. The last phase of the White House plan is allowing vulnerable individuals to participate in public interactions and permitting employers to staff work sites without restrictions.

To prevent another wave of outbreaks, states should only move to this second phase when they report a sustained decrease in cases for at least 14 days. In addition, local hospitals must be able to safely treat all patients who need to be hospitalized "without resorting to crisis standards of care." States must have the capacity to test everyone with COVID-19 symptoms and actively monitor all confirmed cases and their contacts.

US first needs to ensure there are enough tests for health care workers and people who are symptomatic. That means it needs to significantly ramp up capacity from a couple million tests a month to that many per week.

what you should know if someone you live with gets sick:

As soon as your roommate or family member suspects they have symptoms of COVID-19  (or tests positive for the coronavirus), they need to isolate from others until they test negative, or until the symptoms are long gone (more details below).

They should wear a face mask or cloth covering if they're in the same room as you or your housemates and everyone needs to make sure they've thoroughly washed their hands for 20 seconds after interacting. It's also important to keep the house sanitized. A healthy person could reduce contact with a sick person by filling a water pitcher and preparing food for the patient, leaving both at a safe distance for the member of your household to collect.

 

 

 

Republic of Panama Back to work Guidelines:

The stoppage of work activities and the home quarantine declared by the

Panamanian State arise as a consequence of the pandemic by COVID-19, these

steps taken in stages have been necessary to minimize the maximum

the risk of contagion in the workplace and in all social activities that

they involve mobilization and close contact.

COVID-19 disease is a respiratory disease caused by a virus

called SARS-CoV-2. The main symptoms include fever with cough or difficulty

breathe. The virus is spread mainly from person to person through drops

respiratory infections produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or speaks, between

people who are in close contact with each other (less than 2 meters).

Recent studies show that people who never develop symptoms can

transmit the virus even before these symptoms manifest. It is possible that a

person can contract COVID-19 disease by touching a surface or object that

you have the virus and then touch your mouth, nose, or possibly your eyes.

In this context, producers, distributors and consumers are obliged to

comply with the standards established by the health authorities in order to suppress and

mitigate the spread of the virus.

Learn more for a better understanding of how the virus spreads and

as the disease is evolving on the website of the Ministry of Health of

Panama http://minsa.gob.pa/coronavirus-covid19 and PAHO / WHO

https://panama.campusvirtualsp.org/covid-19.

This guide should be used as a reference by companies and workers to

adhere to the preventive measures necessary for a safe return to work in

COVID-19 times.

SCOPE

This guide is intended for producers, distributors, and consumers; the

micro-enterprises, medium-sized companies, large companies and their clients which

are obliged to comply with the standards established by the health authorities

in order to mitigate the spread of the virus.

JUSTIFICATION

The national government, the Governing Body of Health in Panama, Ministry of

Health, the Ministry of Labor and Labor Development, the Ministry of Commerce

and Industries, with the advice and collaboration of Occupational Health and Safety

of the Social Security Fund, have issued this guide to facilitate adherence

to health, hygiene and safety measures by companies that

find operating totally or partially, as for those that are

authorized to begin their preparation for return to work, in the

framework of the entry into force of Ministerial Resolution DM-137-20 of March

2020, from the Ministry of Labor and Labor Development, and the Ministry of

Panama Health. "Protocol to preserve hygiene and health in the

workplace for the prevention against COVID-19 ", and the preparation of the

"Plan for the Return to Socioeconomic and Health Normality Post

COVID-19 ”.

We prepare for a stage of the epidemic that will be crucial to success

of the fight to control contagion by COVID-19, according to the Center

Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) "companies and

employers can prevent and slow the spread of COVID-19… ”

implementing action protocols, based on health and safety plans

and occupational hygiene and the prevention and control guidelines of the COVID-19.

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19)

JUSTIFICATION

The national government, the Governing Body of Health in Panama, Ministry of

Health, the Ministry of Labor and Labor Development, the Ministry of Commerce

and Industries, with the advice and collaboration of Health and Safety GENERAL OBJECTIVE

Establish guidelines to achieve strict adherence by

employers, workers and customers to prevent and control measures against

the risk of COVID-19 infection in work environments to achieve a

return to work in an orderly, gradual and safe manner.

IV. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES

• Establish comprehensive guidelines for action, prevention and control for

Adequate approach to measures against the risk of infection by COVID19 in companies or related to work activity, whether formal or informal.

• Determine the actions and responsibilities of a technical nature with

multidisciplinary approach that serves as a consultation tool for

all interested parties in relation to the processes of return to

I work in front of COVID-19.

• Contribute joint efforts to reduce the impact of COVID-19 in the

scope of workers' health and society in general.

Protect the physical and mental health of workers exposed to COVID-19

with the interest of mitigating psychosocial risks and avoiding aggravation of

sequels resulting from work activity.

• Guarantee the provision of personal protective equipment and supplies for

part of the employer for compliance with the sanitary measures of

prevention and control before COVID-19.

• Point out the responsibility of workers for compliance with the

recommended prevention and control measures.

V. SANITARY MEASURES FOR BUSINESS OPERATIONS -

COVID-19

Companies must meet the following (5) points to develop in the

specific protocols by economic sector:

1. Organization of the Special Committee on Health and Hygiene for Prevention

and attention of COVID-19 in each public or private institution, companies

and economic sector.

to. Compliance with the protocols and guides issued by the Authority

Sanitary.

2. Prevention measures and general controls for workers,

employers, customers, suppliers and visitors:

to. Frequent hand hygiene: Hand washing with soap and water

and use of alcohol gel;

b. Use of masks; respiratory label and others

recommendations.

c. Physical distance: at least 2 meters. between people in

public and work sites;

d. Personal protective equipment according to the activity of the

job title and inherent risks.

and. Cleaning and disinfecting areas and surfaces frequently;

F. Proper waste management

3. Establish special hours and restrictions on the number of people in

so that the physical distance measurement of 2 meters is kept.

as well as other modalities such as teleworking (for such purposes

use digital and technological means);

4. Monitoring of symptoms of collaborators and clients;

5. Management of work stress

ORGANIZATION OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND HYGIENE FOR

PREVENTION AND CARE OF COVID-19 IN EACH PUBLIC INSTITUTION OR

PRIVATE, BUSINESSES AND ECONOMIC SECTOR.

The companies will create a "Special Committee on Health and Hygiene for Prevention

and Attention of COVID-19 ”, made up of a minimum of 2 to 6 workers,

depending on the size of the company, Resolution No. DM-137-2020, from Monday 16

March 2020.

This committee is special, exclusively formed to attend the prevention and

attention of the COVID-19 virus within companies. The term of

The committee will function for the duration of the pandemic by COVID-19

indicated by the World Health Organization and duly confirmed by the

Ministry of Health.

Companies that have the Health, Safety and Hygiene Committee in the

Work in accordance with the provisions of the General Regulations for the Prevention of

Professional and Occupational Safety and Hygiene Risks, these committees can

assume the role of biological risk surveillance that concerns us at moments of COVID19 after training.

The company undertakes to include and maintain the prevention of biological risk

by COVID-19 within its Occupational Risk Prevention Management System

by affidavit and this in turn inserted into its administrative management

whose minimum contents are:

to. Establish a mechanism to detect workers in a timely manner

symptomatic and asymptomatic;

b. Implement a process that defines the methodology and the frequency with which

they will carry out the tests approved by the Health Authorities;

c. Report to the health authorities any case with symptoms of CoVID-19;

d. Communication and training of workers in hygiene habits and

implementation and updating of protocols;

and. Development, dissemination and placement of material alluding to the measures of

hygiene, symptoms, contact numbers, among others

F. Develop a timely logistics that guarantees the protection equipment

timely and appropriate individual

In compliance with Article No. 246, of Law 51 of December 27, 2005,

Organic of the Social Security Fund and Resolution 45,588-JD 2011 of the

General Regulations for Risk Prevention, Safety and Hygiene in the

Job.

Every entity, institution or company must have a special Health Committee

and hygiene for the prevention and control of organized COVID-19, which among its

responsibilities will have:

to. Review compliance with protocols and procedures related to

COVID-19 control and its permanent update.

b. Monitor compliance with all measures determined by the

company to guarantee the health of collaborators and visitors;

c. Establish a mechanism to detect workers in a timely manner

symptomatic and asymptomatic;

d. Implement a process that defines the methodology and the frequency with which

the tests approved by the Health Authorities will be carried out;

and. Report any suspicion of CoVID-19 to the health authorities;

F. Communication and training of collaborators on measures of

prevention and control, hygiene habits and implementation and updating

protocols;

g. Development, dissemination and placement of material alluding to the measures of

hygiene, symptoms, contact numbers, among others.

h. Maintain the confidentiality of the information resulting from cases of

collaborators affected by covid-19.

to. COMPLIANCE WITH THE PROTOCOLS AND SANITARY GUIDELINES ISSUED

BY THE SANITARY AUTHORITY.

For a better understanding of how it spreads, how it is evolving and

to comply with the Prevention and Control Measures of COVID-19 visit the site

website of the Ministry of Health of Panama http://minsa.gob.pa/coronavirus-covid19 and of

PAHO / WHO https://panama.campusvirtualsp.org/covid-19.

Each public or private institution, companies and economic sector must manage the

updated and official information of COVID in Panama and must have the

Guides and Protocols issued by the Ministry of Health. You have the responsibility

keep collaborators informed about the COVID situation and must

periodically train on the subject and monitor strict compliance with the

themselves.

The COVID-19 Committee will serve as a supervising agent, responsible for reviewing and

update the protocols and procedures related to the control of the COVID of the

company or institution and to monitor compliance with all measures

determined by the company to guarantee the health of collaborators and clients

coordinating with the regional liaison of the ministry of health.

GENERAL PREVENTION AND CONTROL MEASURES:

to. FREQUENT HAND HYGIENE: HAND WASHING WITH WATER AND

SOAP AND USE OF ALCOHOLATED GEL

Frequent hand washing with water and liquid soap for 40-60

seconds, dry your hands with a paper towel and use the paper towel to

close the tap. If neither soap nor water is available, it can be used

60-95% alcohol gel. When the hands are obviously dirty or

after sanitizing three times in a row with alcohol gel you should wash

hands with soap and water.

Collaborators responsibility:

• Carry out hand hygiene with soap and water or disinfect them with gel

alcoholado every 30 minutes, or after each transaction in the case of

collaborators with frequent contact with customers.

• Carry out hand hygiene frequently with soap and water or use the

alcoholic gel. It should also be done before or after touching the

face, nose, eyes or mouth, also after coughing or sneezing, before or

after putting on and taking off masks, when touching wearing surfaces

common or high contact, or change of activity, as well as before and after

going to the bathroom for their physiological needs (https://www.cdc.gov Centro

for Disease Control and Prevention 2020).

• All collaborators must carry out hand hygiene: wash their hands with

soap and water or disinfect them with alcohol gel when arriving and leaving your area

work, restrooms and cafeteria.

Responsibility of the Company:

• Maintain the continuous provision in the health services of supplies

basic hand hygiene (water, liquid soap, paper towels, paper

hygienic and alcohol gel 60 to 95%).

• It must be guaranteed to have a sink with water, liquid soap and paper

towel for both collaborators and clients.

• Place alcohol-based gel dispensers: installed at the entrances,

common areas, offices, among other areas of the establishment so that

clients and collaborators have access to hand hygiene.

• The company will provide hygiene products in designated areas and bathrooms or

sanitary areas.

• Delivery of alcohol gel to collaborators.

USE OF MASKS, RESPIRATORY LABEL AND OTHERS

RECOMMENDATIONS.

The use of a mask or mouth covers is essential, in the case of

a single use these must dispose of it correctly to be effective and to

avoid increasing the risk of transmission associated with use and disposal

incorrect.

Correct use of masks:

• Put on the mask carefully to cover the mouth and nose and

tie it firmly so that there are no gaps with the face;

• Do not touch it while wearing it;

• Take it off with the correct technique (undoing it at the nape of the neck without touching its part

frontal);

• After inadvertently removing or touching a used mask, wash

hands with an alcoholic solution, or with soap and water if they are visibly

dirty

• As soon as the mask is wet or dirty, replace it with a clean and dry one;

• Do not reuse single-use masks;

• Dispose of single-use masks immediately after use.

• Surgical masks should be emphasized for use by personnel who, for

their activities have close or direct contact without additional barriers.

• In the case of workers who do not have close direct contact with clients

and that make use of reusable cloth masks, in addition to following the

recommendations for correct use of masks, these should be

washed daily.

Respiratory label and other recommendations:

In those times when you are not wearing a mask such as lunchtime,

snack among others must comply with the respiratory label: cover the nose

and mouth with the angle of the arm or with a disposable handkerchief when coughing or sneezing,

discard it in a double closed plastic bag and carry out hand hygiene.

All workers must have access to paper towels and disposable tissues.

The company must maintain and supply information to workers and customers

on prevention and control measures for COVID, using boards

news, videos, posters, flyers, social networks, emails, among

others:

• Frequent hand washing with soap and water;

• respiratory label;

Do not share food, drinks, dishes, glasses or cutlery;

• Importance of keeping work areas well ventilated;

• Do not touch your mouth and nose with your hands.

• Do not greet with kisses, hands or hugs;

• Avoid spitting on the floor and other surfaces exposed to the medium

environment.

If a worker shows signs and symptoms of a respiratory infection:

• It is recommended NOT TO ATTEND your workplace, put on a mask

to contain secretions, seek medical attention and follow

recommendations.

Responsibility of the Company:

• Delivery of daily masks to all collaborators.

• Ensure that all company collaborators wear masks

correctly. The use of masks is mandatory as established

by national health authorities for all staff inside and outside

of the establishment and those who have to mobilize due to their

functions.

• Have a person or security personnel who oversees that customers

and external staff to the store have masks in order to

ensure entry to the store with this element of protection, to

reduce risks of contagion.

• Continuous provision of disposable tissues for staff in areas

such as dining rooms, rest areas etc.

c. PHYSICAL DISTANCE: AT LEAST 2 MTS BETWEEN PEOPLE IN

PUBLIC AND LABOR SITES.

The entrance to the establishment will be controlled according to its capacity,

so that a security perimeter can be maintained around each

person (2mts between people).

• Customer distancing; entrance rows and boxes. Stores should

have physical distance signaling, in areas such as boxes

and entering stores, since it can lead to crowds,

in order to prevent contagion.

• Collaborators must monitor that clients maintain the

minimum security space inside the establishment.

The staff must maintain a minimum physical distance of 2 meters.

between them and customers. In the event that the distance is less than

2 mts. It should not be for more than 10 minutes, avoid physical contact.

• In cases where this distance cannot be maintained, such as boxes

(cashier / client), additional protection or barrier measures will be taken

to avoid infections.

• Employee distancing: Store facilities

must have physical distance signage in areas that

commonly they can have crowds by the collaborators,

such as canteens, boxes, merchandise dispatch points, stalls

group work, the place of marking the arrival and departure of the shift.

• A distance of 2 meters must be kept. between each job.

• Limitation of number of people: A capacity must be established

maximum number of people for each closed area of ​​the company, to meet

with the established physical distance of 2 meters.

o Dining rooms;

o Meeting and training rooms;

o Cafeterias;

o Attention points;

o Cellar.

• Staggered lunch shifts are established to avoid crowding.

Collaborators must keep a distance of 2mts.

• The adoption of technologies is promoted to minimize the transfer of

physical documents.

o Manipulation of credit cards only by the client.

o Electronic billing system.

o Online payments, etc.

d. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT ACCORDING TO THE ACTIVITY OF

JOB POSITION AND RISKS INHERENT IN THEM.

The use of personal protective equipment for prevention the COVID-19 goes

to depend on the occupation of each worker or the level of risk

to which it is exposed. The cases in which the

personal protective equipment are:

o When the worker presents any of the symptoms of COVID-19

such as cough, fever or shortness of breath, you need to use

mask and immediately seek medical attention from

Health authorities.

o When due to the particularity of the work there is exposure to much

transit of people, clients, direct treatment with the agglomeration of

people, etc .; masks must be used or

some method of 2 linear meter distance between clients and

workers.

o In case where due to the particularity of the job, the person has

exposure to dust, gases, movement of boxes, handling of

chemicals, paints etc .; will have to use it on a mandatory basis

some type of respiratory protection, masks or respirator that

also allow the collection of dust particles.

o Gloves will only be necessary in case the

particularity of the person's occupation is required, such as

food handling, cleaning staff etc. It is important

remember that the use of gloves does not replace hand washing.

o Eye protection will be used when there is a risk of contamination

from the eyes from splashes or drops, or chemical risks,

biological, physical etc. (for example: blood, body fluid,

secretions and excretions).

NOTE: The use of gloves is not recommended in the collaborators of the

companies or the general public, except those cleaning workers,

cleaners, food handlers or those positions

that require it depending on the exposure to hazards (biological or chemical).

• “The use of latex gloves is recommended for staff

toilet that cares for patients, but not for everyday use. The

The WHO has also not recommended that people wear gloves

community way in activities that is not indicated.

• Gloves give a “false sense of security”.

recommends hand hygiene as a preventive measure,

after contact of surfaces.

• Misuse of gloves favors the spread of

microorganisms to other surfaces and people.

• PERFORM HAND HYGIENE FREQUENTLY.

Employee liability

• They must use the equipment rationally and safely.

• They must use the protective equipment according to the level of

risk described above

• They will not be able to share any personal protective equipment (PPE)

such as gloves, masks, boots, and overalls.

• Proper management of waste and PPE used.

Responsibility of Entrepreneurs

• Continuous provision of all personal protective equipment

• Supply their workers with PPE depending on their needs;

• Monitor that workers use personal protective equipment

rationally and safely.

• Train workers on the correct use of equipment

personal protection.

CLEANING AND DISINFECTING SURFACES FREQUENTLY

One of the basic measures to prevent getting sick is to frequently

cleaning and disinfecting the surfaces of our environments. Is

found that microorganisms remain alive on surfaces so

that this process is important to take care of ourselves and others.

It is recommended:

• Daily cleaning and disinfection of all areas, including floors, bathrooms, kitchens

etc

• Cleaning and disinfection of workstations and care areas (recipe book,

goods reception and delivery stations, boxes, wrapping areas, in

counter of recipes, counters of receipt and delivery of goods, boxes,

wrap, jewelry, fine cosmetics and perfumery, phones, ticket

parcel, waiting chairs and work surfaces etc.), and any other surface

high contact every 2 hours.

• Cleaning and disinfectant of other high contact surfaces: every 2 hours in

door handles or locks, grab bars or stair rails, faucets

sink and sink, fridges, toilet lever. handles, buttons

door access, railings, handrails, microwave keyboards.

• Deep cleaning and disinfection every two weeks.

• Daily cleaning and disinfection of the company's transportation vehicles,

home delivery vehicles, transport containers (thermal packaging,

baskets, bags, boxes, or any other container). Disinfection between deliveries

of the thermal containers, boxes or baskets used in deliveries.

• NOTE: The cleaning frequency of these vehicles will be determined based on:

delivery frequency, type of product delivered, presence of spills etc.

Frequently clean and disinfect surfaces in contact with or near

people as well as bathrooms, services and the surrounding surfaces such as objects

commonly used and high contact surfaces (frequently touched), such as

door knobs, sink faucets, bars, railings (handrail), lever

discharge from toilets, telephones, switches, desk surfaces,

light switches, telephones, and any other contacting surface

frequent. Establish a log for compliance verification.

This process involves three basic steps that must be performed in the following order:

Cleaning, Rinsing and drying and Disinfection

1. Cleaning: The cleaning of these surfaces must be done with water, soap or

detergent and clean cloth.

2. Rinse and dry: with water and wait for it to dry.

3. Disinfection: After cleaning, apply a disinfectant and let dry.

Recommended disinfectants: chlorinated compounds - sodium hypochlorite (Chlorine)

5.25% or 3.5% in a dilution of 0.05%, 70% alcohol, hydrogen peroxide

or quaternary ammonium compounds.

"Part" can be used for any unit of measure (liter, gallon, etc.), or

using any meter (cup, glass, bottle, bottle, jug, etc).

Observation Sodium Hypochlorite must be prepared and used

immediately, do not store after diluted as it loses its effectiveness

after 12 hours.

Do not mix chlorine with other chemicals, it is toxic and the chlorine loses its effect

disinfectant. Do not mix with disinfectants.

In cases where the surface has technical contraindications by the manufacturer

for the use of Chlorine (example: computers) may be used in its absence

70% alcohol or other disinfectant recommended by the manufacturer or used

domestic.

• When cleaning and disinfecting, personnel must use PPE

(closed footwear, in those places where contact of

large volumes of water use waterproof footwear, protective glasses

eyepiece, gloves, gowns or apron) and when you finish washing your hands with water and

soap.

• Remember hand hygiene before and after placing and removing any

personal protection equipment.

• It is recommended that cleaning personnel DO NOT dry sweep. In

instead, mop up the mop or mop and use the

recommended products for the office environment. (Quick guide for

cleaning and disinfection of surfaces and objects in the home, schools, environments

and other public settings, regulatory package of the Ministry of Health

2020).

NOTE: When cleaning areas where people were to be cleaned

suspected or confirmed of COVID-19 it is important that these areas are

well ventilated, to minimize the risk of people who will perform these

labors. See guide to cleaning and disinfecting surfaces where they were

people suspected or confirmed by covid-19 (offices, salons of

class, companies, rooms, among others) at www.minsa.gob.pa.

F. WASTE MANAGEMENT

When using a single-use mask, it is essential to use and dispose of it

correctly to avoid increasing the risk of transmission associated with

use and disposal of PPE.

A differentiated waste management is recommended such as:

face masks, as well as possibly contaminated waste such as handkerchiefs

disposable, gauze with secretions, dirty gloves. They must be placed in double

bag and closed container, try to disinfect them.

3. ESTABLISH SPECIAL SCHEDULES AND RESTRICTION OF THE NUMBER OF

PEOPLE, AS WELL AS OTHER MODALITIES LIKE TELEWORK.

Work policies are established for all those who by reason of their

functions must be physically present at points of sale. If

store staff must work in person.

• For face-to-face roles avoid personnel from vulnerable groups

(adult collaborators over 60 years of age, workers with comorbidity,

pregnant women etc.) for which the modality may be considered

teleworking;

• The return to work will be gradual and scheduled, for which you can

establish special hours where there are no interlocking shifts, to

decrease risk;

• In the case of vulnerable workers they can use vacations

accumulated.

• In case of temporary modification of the working day, this

will be carried out based on Article 159 of the Labor Code and the Decree

Executive No. 71 of March 13, 2020.

Control of access or entry of customers to the establishment, to avoid

crowds. These controls are established at the entrance of the establishment,

where the person in charge of the same will take an entrance control, will organize

the respective rows with spacing according to signs and will allow entry

of clients so as not to generate crowds within the establishment.

MONITORING OF SYMPTOMS OF COLLABORATORS AND CLIENTS

Taking temperature at the entrance of the establishment in order to determine

initial symptoms of COVID-19. It must be taken daily at the beginning of the day

the temperature to all collaborators, keeping track of the temperature and

What additional symptoms do you have related to COVID-19?

recommends carrying out random monitoring in different departments during the

day.

If the temperature is above 38 ° C or more, the case will be reported to

authorities (169, ROSA), must be sent to the health facility that

it corresponds.

Taking the temperature to customers, visitors, suppliers or foreign personnel

they must enter the establishment, at the point of entry. If it is for

above 38 ° C, you will not be allowed to enter the establishment and must be

Referred to the appropriate health facility, or call 169 or ROSA.

Upon entering the temperature of the customer, service provider or staff will be measured

using a non-contact thermometer, using the following steps:

to. The infrared sensor must be clean.

b. The taking of the person must be done indoors.

c. Place the measurement end in the region approximately 1

cm from the forehead preferably above the center of the eyebrow, without reaching the

Contact. Wait approximately 3 seconds.

d. Use a cotton ball or gauze impregnated with alcohol (70% isopropyl) to

clean the outside of the thermometer and the measuring end at the end of the

working day.

The heads of the areas must inform Human Resources if they identify

a collaborator with symptoms (fever, persistent dry cough, difficulty

breathing or also recurrence of symptoms such as headaches, tiredness,

sore throat or runny nose).

to. The suspected cases identified will be reported to 169 or ROSA

for proper monitoring and control, coordinate your care with the Center

Health or nearest polyclinic.

b. The personnel assigned to the COVID Committee will carry out the investigation of the

worker with symptoms, will inquire if he has been in contact with people

suspected or confirmed by COVID-19.

c. Follow the recommendations given by health personnel in case of

detection of positive cases.

. Log of disabilities and absences to follow up on

collaborators reporting symptoms of COVID-19.

and. A coordination mechanism will be established between MINSA and CSS and the

Company - COVID-19 Committee for notification and measures to be taken in

case of collaborators with COVID-19.

5. WORK STRESS MANAGEMENT

Having the presence of COVID-19 cases causes stress in society and this

directly affects job stress; this is why employers

allow their workers to take short active breaks from work during

working day with the aim of performing stretching exercises, breathing,

look for water to hydrate, go to the bathroom, etc., you can also implement another

type of psychological support strategies. This will allow for good harmony.

within the organization. See APPENDIX 3: Active Work Break

ANNEX 3: ACTIVE WORK BREAK

What is a work break?

It consists of a series of movements that includes stretching and warming up, which have

They are designed to be done before, during and after the working day.

Its importance is to decrease the risk of presenting a muscle injury or disorder–

skeletal to increase efficiency and comfort at work.

This activity is very effective in relieving stress, reducing physical inactivity and

sedentary lifestyle, and thus increase worker morale, prevent postural injuries

caused by repetitive movements and efforts as a result of work.

Exercise in sitting position

Work Break Benefit

· Reduce muscle tension.

· Prevents musculoskeletal injuries.

· Decreases stress and feeling of fatigue.

· Improve attention and concentration.

· Improve posture.